It is my third year learning at Zhejiang Pan’an RTVU and I have learned a lot in the last three years.

Open education has attracted students from all walks of life, such as people working in the fields, teaching in a school, or working behind a bank counter, back into the classroom, and helped them realize their dreams of further education.

“Studying is tiring but it helps to expand your mind, so I prefer to think of studying at a Radio and Television University (RTVU) as a kind of enjoyment. Starting a business is difficult but it can bring you happiness, so I treat my job as a career. Pursuing your dreams is hard but it can awaken your soul, so I use my dreams as a guide.”

Introduction: Li Fucheng, born in September 1954, a senior economist, studied administrative management at Beijing Radio and TV University from 1983 to 1985, and has received postgraduate education. He serves as board chairman, general manager, and secretary of the Party Committee of Beijing Yanjing Beer Co., Ltd.

I am a primary school teacher from a mountain village. I have always had a college dream.

Roses given, fragrance in hand. A group of Sichuan RTVU students have begun focusing their efforts on their hometowns. Wherever they go, they have their hometown and the local people in mind. While some grow wealthy after starting up their own business, they never forget to repay their hometown. They help the poor left-behind children and other people living in poverty, as well as contribute to the development of their hometown. To them, devotion itself is a form of happiness.

Sichuan Daily reports that a group of Radio and TV University (RTVU) alumni have been working in Sichuan’s remote mountainous areas and ethnic minority areas for decades. They have chosen a life of poverty, making their contribution to rural education. Through their work they have sown the seeds of hope for children in these areas.

According to a report from enorth.com.cn, although Zhang Yufang, a girl born in the 1990s from Panzhihua, Sichuan Province, suffers from “porcelain doll disease”, her attitude to life remains optimistic. When the reporter met her at People's Hospital in Wuqing District, Tianjin yesterday, she was wheeling her chair back and forth, helping the other patients on her ward who had already been discharged to copy their medical records.

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